Turn Around Bright Eyes,

My name is Lana.
I am a collector of quotes. I'm a type one diabetic. I work at a thrift store. I play the alto sax. I have absolutely no idea what I want from life. I'm looking for my purpose and someone to travel the world with.

Read the Printed Word!

April 17, 2014 at 12:34am
41,524 notes
Reblogged from jamesmdavisson

kakashifan-lol:

aneternalscoutandabrownie:

jamesmdavisson:

So far, I have been enjoying the Adventures of Business Cat a great deal, possibly more than is appropriate for an adult human. (All of these are from the webcomic Happy Jar)

UPDATE: Now with more Business.

YES ALL THE BUSINESS CAT STRIPS IN ONE PLACE

Gentlemen.

(via princecatfood)

April 16, 2014 at 11:35pm
80 notes
Reblogged from insulinismylife

Forever with Diabetes →

insulinismylife:

In adolescent psych, I learned that teenagers believe in the invincibility fable.

That part of being young is not considering getting hurt.

And I wonder what that feels like.

Because I am painfully aware of how lucky I am to be alive

Every finger prick, carb counted,…

11:07pm
432 notes
Reblogged from imgfave
imgfave:

Posted by MindyLennon

imgfave:

Posted by MindyLennon

10:44pm
106 notes
Reblogged from diabetic-disaster01

(Source: diabetic-disaster01, via lollingpancreas)

10:37pm
60,351 notes
Reblogged from lawebloca
missingkitsune:

"There there, I’m sorry I scared you. *pats and kisses* you’re a good dog, good dog."

missingkitsune:

"There there, I’m sorry I scared you. *pats and kisses* you’re a good dog, good dog."

(via you-theocean-andme)

10:32pm
16,809 notes
Reblogged from vayena

at a pool party

vayena:

"hey bukowski no offense but why dont you take your shirt off in the pool"
"why do we run from the rain but soak in tubs full of water"
"aight take it easy man"

(via perksofbeinganenglishmajor)

10:26pm
58 notes
Reblogged from dendroica
dendroica:

Even Small Medical Advances Can Mean Big Jumps in Bills

Traditionally, insurers lost money by covering people with chronic illnesses, because they often ended up hospitalized with myriad complications as their diseases progressed. Today, the routine care costs of many chronic illnesses eclipse that of acute care because new treatments that keep patients well have become a multibillion-dollar business opportunity for device and drug makers and medical providers.
The high price of new treatments for diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, colitis and other chronic diseases contribute mightily to the United States’ $2.7 trillion annual health care bill.
More than 1.5 million Americans have Type 1 diabetes and cannot survive without frequent insulin doses, so they are utterly dependent on a small number of producers of supplies and drugs, which have great leeway to set prices. (Patients with the far more common Type 2 diabetes — linked to obesity — still produce insulin and can improve with lifestyle changes and weight loss, or on oral medicines.)
That captive audience of Type 1 diabetics has spawned lines of high-priced gadgets and disposable accouterments, borrowing business models from technology companies like Apple: Each pump and monitor requires the separate purchase of an array of items that are often brand and model specific.
A steady stream of new models and updates often offer dubious improvement: colored pumps; talking, bilingual meters; sensors reporting minute-by-minute sugar readouts. Ms. Hayley’s new pump will cost $7,350 (she will pay $2,500 under the terms of her insurance). But she will also need to pay her part for supplies, including $100 monitor probes that must be replaced every week, disposable tubing that she must change every three days and 10 or so test strips every day.
That does not even include insulin, which has been produced with genetic engineering and protected by patents, so that a medicine that cost a few dollars when Ms. Hayley was a child now often sells for more than $200 a vial, meaning some patients must pay more than $4,000 a year. Other refinements have benefited a minority of patients but raised prices for all. There are no generics in the United States.

(via NYTimes.com)

dendroica:

Even Small Medical Advances Can Mean Big Jumps in Bills

Traditionally, insurers lost money by covering people with chronic illnesses, because they often ended up hospitalized with myriad complications as their diseases progressed. Today, the routine care costs of many chronic illnesses eclipse that of acute care because new treatments that keep patients well have become a multibillion-dollar business opportunity for device and drug makers and medical providers.

The high price of new treatments for diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, colitis and other chronic diseases contribute mightily to the United States’ $2.7 trillion annual health care bill.

More than 1.5 million Americans have Type 1 diabetes and cannot survive without frequent insulin doses, so they are utterly dependent on a small number of producers of supplies and drugs, which have great leeway to set prices. (Patients with the far more common Type 2 diabetes — linked to obesity — still produce insulin and can improve with lifestyle changes and weight loss, or on oral medicines.)

That captive audience of Type 1 diabetics has spawned lines of high-priced gadgets and disposable accouterments, borrowing business models from technology companies like Apple: Each pump and monitor requires the separate purchase of an array of items that are often brand and model specific.

A steady stream of new models and updates often offer dubious improvement: colored pumps; talking, bilingual meters; sensors reporting minute-by-minute sugar readouts. Ms. Hayley’s new pump will cost $7,350 (she will pay $2,500 under the terms of her insurance). But she will also need to pay her part for supplies, including $100 monitor probes that must be replaced every week, disposable tubing that she must change every three days and 10 or so test strips every day.

That does not even include insulin, which has been produced with genetic engineering and protected by patents, so that a medicine that cost a few dollars when Ms. Hayley was a child now often sells for more than $200 a vial, meaning some patients must pay more than $4,000 a year. Other refinements have benefited a minority of patients but raised prices for all. There are no generics in the United States.

(via NYTimes.com)

(via diabeticposts)

10:15pm
112,014 notes
Reblogged from gifak-net
mecksickan:

So you just gonna bring me a birthday gift on my birthday to my birthday party on my birthday with a birthday gift?

mecksickan:

So you just gonna bring me a birthday gift on my birthday to my birthday party on my birthday with a birthday gift?

(via diabeetus01)

8:34pm
70,752 notes
Reblogged from tfios-changed-my-life
tfios-changed-my-life:

So this little cigarette right here has sparked a whole new brand of TFiOS hate, much of which is coming from people who claimed to love the book. 
Many people are now pointing out how “pretentious” Augustus is, and I can’t help but think, You’re only just now realizing this. He was written to be a seemingly pretentious and arrogant person. The acknowledgement of this is actually highly important because, without it, the book loses the message that a hero’s journey is that of strength to weakness. 
Augustus Waters has big dreams for himself. He wants to be known and remembered; he wants to be a hero; he wants to be seen as perfect. But there’s already something standing in his way… He has a disability, and society tells him that a person cannot be both perfect and disabled. So what does he do? He creates a persona for himself. He tries to appear older and wiser than he is. But the pretentious side of him is NOT who he truly is. It’s all an act. (This is evident in the fact that he often uses words in the wrong context.)
And when his cancer returns, we begin to see his mask cracking. The true Augustus begins to bleed through… Hazel even takes notice of this from time to time. And by the time we get to the gas station scene, Augustus is no longer the picture of perfection he was when we met him. The play has been canceled. The actor must reveal himself. And he’s revealed to be a weak, defenseless boy, succumbing to the cancer that is made of him. 
THE PRETENTIOUSNESS IS INTENTIONAL. It stands to show Augustus’s journey from flawless to flawed, from strong to weak. It’s the key to understanding that Augustus was the hero he always wanted to be, even if he didn’t realized it. 

tfios-changed-my-life:

So this little cigarette right here has sparked a whole new brand of TFiOS hate, much of which is coming from people who claimed to love the book. 

Many people are now pointing out how “pretentious” Augustus is, and I can’t help but think, You’re only just now realizing this. He was written to be a seemingly pretentious and arrogant person. The acknowledgement of this is actually highly important because, without it, the book loses the message that a hero’s journey is that of strength to weakness

Augustus Waters has big dreams for himself. He wants to be known and remembered; he wants to be a hero; he wants to be seen as perfect. But there’s already something standing in his way… He has a disability, and society tells him that a person cannot be both perfect and disabled. So what does he do? He creates a persona for himself. He tries to appear older and wiser than he is. But the pretentious side of him is NOT who he truly is. It’s all an act. (This is evident in the fact that he often uses words in the wrong context.)

And when his cancer returns, we begin to see his mask cracking. The true Augustus begins to bleed through… Hazel even takes notice of this from time to time. And by the time we get to the gas station scene, Augustus is no longer the picture of perfection he was when we met him. The play has been canceled. The actor must reveal himself. And he’s revealed to be a weak, defenseless boy, succumbing to the cancer that is made of him. 

THE PRETENTIOUSNESS IS INTENTIONAL. It stands to show Augustus’s journey from flawless to flawed, from strong to weak. It’s the key to understanding that Augustus was the hero he always wanted to be, even if he didn’t realized it. 

(via littlexsweetxthing)

8:29pm
1,576 notes
Reblogged from deeplystained

deeplystained:

"I read today that your pupils dilate
when you see someone you love.
I’d always thought it was just my mind
playing tricks on me, but now I know it’s true: 
Somehow, the world is a brighter place
when I’m around you.”

a poem about how my eyes are always trying to swallow you whole

(via catastrophic-galaxies)

8:21pm
118,009 notes
Reblogged from kenby
kenby:

why u lick me

kenby:

why u lick me

(via kittykhole)

8:09pm
32,988 notes
Reblogged from dimmadamn

I am the sea and nobody owns me.

— Pippi Longstocking (1997)

(Source: dimmadamn, via doublehelixnucleotide)

2:52pm
3 notes
I like to call this color the blood of my enemies.

I like to call this color the blood of my enemies.

1:08pm
101,841 notes
Reblogged from quase-fraqueza

(Source: quase-fraqueza, via i-shouldnt-doesnt-mean-i-wont)

12:02am
41 notes
Reblogged from homicidalphone

Sorry, can’t talk, got medical devices screaming at me.

— When my pump fails in the middle of a conversation. (via homicidalphone)

(via lollingpancreas)